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Home Disorders Lower back pain / Lumbago
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What should you do if you experience lumbago / sciatica?

Lumbago

Some people suffer from an occasional or cyclical unrelenting lock-up of the lumbar region. When getting up in the morning, or when making a sudden wrong movement, the person is stricken with immobility accompanied by shooting pains as soon as s/he attempts to move. The lumbar column seems frozen. Indeed, any movement seems to make the situation worse.

The medical term for the proverbial "back pain" is lumbago. Any movement seems to worsen the situation and the pain may become so strong that those affected can only crawl on all fours and need someone to help them.

We have observed that regular backache sufferers generally have an acutely tilted pelvis associated with severe muscular contractions in the lumbar region.

The pelvis is usually tilted off its horizontal axis because of varying tension caused by the symmetrical muscle pairs that contribute to its alignment.

Backache is generally sparked by sharp, sudden movements made "from cold" with the pelvis in this condition; this triggers an involuntary defense mechanism of stiffening of the entire lumbar musculature, which prevents any possible strains of the muscles and ligaments that had been suddenly over-stressed. This cramp is induced by the body to prevent hyperextension of muscles and ligaments and to protect the nerves exiting the spinal canal.

Significant and long-lasting improvements in general posture, hollow back (hyperlordosis), and pelvic obliquity are possible after ATLANTOtec® treatments. As a result the main causes of lumbago are removed.

Experience shows that many patients who have received ATLANTOtec® treatments no longer suffer from the condition.

The treatment can also be performed during an acute lumbago phase and, indeed, is doubly useful, since the deep massage needed in preparation for the treatment can also immediately alleviate the pain.

 

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Idiopathic scoliosis
 

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